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Peter J. Morgan

Peter J. Morgan B.E. (Mech.), Dip. Teaching
Consulting Forensic Engineer, Marine Designer, Technical Writer, Sub-editor & Technical Editor
Creator of SuperConic™ – the innovative parametric hull design software
13 Stratford Avenue, Milford, Auckland, NEW ZEALAND
Ph: +64 9 489 4972 mobile: 021 489 497 Skype: pbnc.morgan
email: peter.morgan@assessco.co.nz

SPECIALIST SKILLS

Technical Writing and Editing

Peter is a professional engineer who also has the rare ability to write clearly and concisely in world-class English. He has a special gift for proof-reading and technical editing and usually spots errors in logic, as well as spelling and grammatical errors, in technical English and also errors in the use of units of measurement that do not comply with the requirements of the International System of Units (SI), the modern form of the metric system, all at first reading. He can add great value to any technical editing team, or take sole responsibility and do a world-class job. Some of the most intellectually challenging work that Peter has done includes being emailed Japanese patent applications, translated from Japanese by Japanese patent attorneys into very poor, ambiguous English and transforming them into patent applications in clear and unambiguous world-class English, ready for filing in the United States Patent Office. One was for new technology used in colour photocopiers, and another was on an automotive direct fuel injection system.

Extensive knowledge of the Marine Industry

Peter grew up around planing powerboats. His father was New Zealand’s second Mercury outboard dealer and owned a succession of trailerable powerboats. Earlier in Peter’s life, in the mid 1960s he was the first New Zealander to perform laboratory tests on composite structural sandwich panels. He used the knowledge gleaned from his tests to design and build New Zealand’s first composite sandwich boat, a 6m deep-V powerboat launched in 1966 and still going! Its hull was used as the plug for the fibreglass Clipper 20 – the only hard-chine Mason Clipper ever! In 1971 Peter modified the Clipper 20 design to become the Morgan 6.3 and later the Morgan 5.3 fibreglass powerboats, renowned to this day for their style, robust construction and legendary seakeeping. For many years Peter has been the Technical Editor for two boating magazines. He takes a keen interest in all matters marine.

Expert Witness

Peter’s deep understanding of engineering mechanics, physics and mathematics, honed over 11 years of lecturing in Mechanical Engineering at Manukau Institute of Technology and years of teaching Mathematics, Physics and Economics at various high schools, coupled with his analytical ability, integrity and sense of fair play, make him an ideal expert witness in litigation over technical disputes. Peter’s hands-on experience as a project engineer and later in building his powerboats and trailers have proven to be invaluable in his later work as an expert witness. Living in Auckland gives Peter a close connection with some of the leading marine designers and builders in New Zealand. Peter has on numerous occasions been contacted by owners, legal representatives and interested parties to peer-review case files and has provided expert opinion and reports regarding matters and issues that have resulted in action in New Zealand’s Courts. One intriguing case in which Peter is involved has become what Peter has dubbed “A Sordid Saga”. It has involved a professional engineer fabricating evidence and using false ‘evidence’, a barrister acting in what Peter honestly and sincerely believes to have been a less than satisfactory manner, in contravention of the ‘duty of care’ he owed to his clients, and the so-called ‘Investigating Committee’ for the professional body for engineering in New Zealand, IPENZ, behaving in a manner which Peter sincerely and honestly believes to be absolutely disgusting and entirely unprofessional. Peter’s submission to the Canterbury Earthquakes Royal Commission, on the role of professional societies in the engineering sector, details this whole sorry, sordid saga. It may be read by Googling PJM ENG.MOR.0001